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Gregory Weyer

Campaign Cycle: 2019
Office: Common Pleas
Details
First Name
Gregory
Last Name
Weyer
Status
Defeated
Campaign Cycle
2019
Office
Common Pleas
Sitting Judge
No
Party
Democrat
Phone
215-298-0997
Email Address
info@gregoryweyer.com
Website
https://gregoryweyer.com/
Ballot Position
38
Button #
28
Votes
3788
Endorsements
Bar Association Rating
Not Recommended
Party/Wards
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Unions
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Progressive Groups
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Clergy
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Public Officials
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News Papers
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Questionnaire
What has been the general nature of your practice?
Criminal Defense
Why do you consider yourself qualified to be judge?
Judicial temperament; strong work ethic; genuine concern for the well-being of others; extensive trial experience; strong desire for fairness and restorative justice; wide range of life experiences that allow for true empathy; insight into the family court system through my identity as a foster dad.
What is it about our criminal justice system that inspires you?
Seeing defendants reform themselves when given a true chance to succeed; seeing advocates go all-in on behalf of a defendant to make sure that man or woman gets the full benefits of their constitutional rights; seeing judges go above and beyond what is required by investing the necessary time and energy to make sure that both defendants and victims truly have their day in court.
What about our current criminal justice system do you believe needs to be reformed?
Cash bail; unjustifiably onerous sentencing structures (including collateral consequences); too much deference to precedent that allows junk science to enter into the court room instead of appropriately evaluating forensic and scientific claims in light of the latest research; some reluctance to do the right thing even when the balancing of the relevant equities requires it.
As a judge, what would your sentencing philosophy be?
The sentencing guidelines are just guidelines, and a final sentence is fully within the discretion of the judge. Sometimes a mitigated sentence will be appropriate; occasionally, an aggravated sentence will be appropriate. But it doesn't make sense to be a slave to the guidelines developed by the legislature when, in the real world, each and every case is unique and different. (Note: The relevant caselaw gives wide deference to judges in the area of sentencing.)
Have you ever woken up in the middle of the night thinking about a case and wishing you had handled something differently? If so, please describe one situation.
Yes; often. There is one case in particular that, based on my advice, my client proceeded by way of a waiver (i.e., "judge-only" or "bench") trial instead by way of a jury trial and the result was not what I expected and not favorable to my client. While I still believe my reasoning was sound, I often wonder if a jury would have seen things differently in this case in a way that led to a different result and, as a result, I have woken up numerous times wishing I had given my client different advice.
Who are your role models and why?
My father because he is a pastor who lives a life marked by steadfastness and compassion. Fellow attorneys whose practice of law is clearly marked more by a concern for helping people than it is by a concern for getting paid. Judges who I have often been in front of who show real concern for people in how they run their courtroom and in the rulings they make from the bench.
What is your favorite book, movie, or tv show of all time and why did it speak to you so much?
Rounders. I discovered Rounders in my mid-/late-20s, at a time in my life when I was questioning a lot of things and ended up going in an entirely different direction both professionally and personally. Of course, in Rounders, Mike McDermott leaves law school to take his shot as a professional poker player. In real life, I left a life that included being an accomplished recreational poker player to go to law school. Go figure.
Name a song that you were obsessed with as a teenager.
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What is you favorite number?
8.
News
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A few years ago, when Alison Macrina was living in Houston, she noticed that the city was voting ever more Democratic, but there was no organized party machine. So, as local judicial elections approached, she recognized there was an opportunity for anyone with an energetic campaign to jump in and...

Created: 09 April 2019