Avatar

Wade Albert

Member since: Wednesday, 11 January 2023
Last Visit: Never
Details
First Name
Wade
Last Name
Albert
Status
Filed
Campaign Cycle
2023
Office
Common Pleas
Sitting Judge
No
Party
Democrat
Phone
215-964-2708
Email Address
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website
http://wadealbertforjudge.com/
Ballot Position
13
Button #
18
Votes
0
Endorsements
Bar Association Rating
Recommended
Party/Wards
Democratic City Committee, 5th Ward, 8th Ward, 9th Ward, 27th Ward, 39A Ward, NW Coalition
Unions
Sheet Metal Workers Local 19, IATSE Local 8
Progressive Groups
Liberty City LGBT Democrats, LGBTQ Victory Fund, Working Families Party, Reclaim
Clergy
---
Public Officials
Former Gov. Ed Rendell, Senator Sharif Street, Senator Jimmy Dillon, Speaker Joanna McClinton, Rep. Morgan Cephas, Rep. Malcolm Kenyatta, Rep. Ben Waxman
News Papers
Philadelphia Gay News
Questionnaire
What has been the general nature of your practice?
I work at Stevens & Lee, P.C., where I primarily practice employment law. Among other things, I litigate claims for employment discrimination and wage/hour law, and provide advice to companies to ensure that they do not violate their employees' rights. I also have side practices in the areas of zoning law and election law.

Further, I have handled many pro bono cases over the years. One of my proudest achievements is that in 2019, the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, Criminal Trial Division, awarded me the Pro Bono Publico Award for my work helping low-income Philadelphians expunge their criminal records.

In the past, I practiced law on the plaintiff-side at a boutique firm, where I represented employees who suffered workplace harassment or discrimination, persons who were denied their civil rights, and individuals who found themselves on the losing end of bad business transactions.

At the beginning of my legal career I clerked for Judge Nitza Quinones Alejandro and Judge Sandra Mazer Moss.
Why do you consider yourself qualified to be judge?
I believe that I am qualified to be a judge because I have broad experience in the law, I have demonstrated a commitment to public service, and I have proven to be a competent leader.

With regard to my experience, I would bring to the bench a knowledge of diverse areas of the law and an understanding of what it means to participate in the justice system from a variety of perspectives. My background provides me with the invaluable ability to approach cases objectively because I understand the viewpoints and concerns of many different stakeholders in the legal system.

My history of public service also shows that I am well suited for the bench. Over the years I have been involved in many organizations, political action committees, and causes that seek to advance equality and improve the community. Among other things, I served as President of the Center City Residents' Association, the civic association that represents the neighborhood of Center City West. I also served as Chair of the Endorsement Committee of the Liberty City LGBTQ+ Democratic Club, a progressive political action committee that advocates for LGBTQ+ issues and seeks to elect LGBTQ+ identifying persons and allies in Southeastern Pennsylvania.

I additionally have volunteered countless hours working pro bono for clients who could not otherwise afford legal representation. I believe this record establishes that, if elected, I will use my office to deliver justice fairly, impartially, and with empathy.
What is it about our criminal justice system that inspires you?
I am most inspired when I meet former offenders who have been able to use the resources available in the criminal justice system to better their lives and become productive members of society.
What about our current criminal justice system do you believe needs to be reformed?
While the criminal justice system in Philadelphia has seen many improvements in recent years, I believe that more work is needed. For example, I believe in sentencing reform to eliminate the sentencing disparities that often negatively impact people of color. I believe that sentences should be crafted to encourage rehabilitation, not set an offender on a path towards recidivism. I also believe that more resources should be channeled into diversion programs to give non-violent offenders the tools they need for better life opportunities.
As a judge, what would your sentencing philosophy be?
I understand the justice system exists to keep streets safe and prevent people from injuring others. Victims are entitled to justice. However, punishments must be rehabilitative. I believe that to the greatest extent possible, people should be given the opportunity for a second chance and the means to pursue a better path moving forward.
Have you ever woken up in the middle of the night thinking about a case and wishing you had handled something differently? If so, please describe one situation.
It happens to me all the time. I mostly worry about what I have done and what I can do to best advance my clients' interests.
Who are your role models and why?
One of my role models is Sonia Sotomayor because she overcame so much adversity in her youth to ultimately become the leading progressive voice on the U.S. Supreme Court. And just as important to me, even though she is one of the most influential people in American government right now, she is humble with a wicked sense of humor.
What is your favorite book, movie, or tv show of all time and why did it speak to you so much?
My favorite book is probably "The Death and Life of Great American Cities" by Jane Jacobs. It helped me realize how all the moving parts in our society impact the vitality of our neighborhoods, and that we need strong, civically-engaged communities to have a functioning city. Before reading this book, I had always loved living in Philadelphia, but I was not fully able to explain why. After reading the book, I understood: our diversity is our greatest strength and it is what allows Philadelphia to thrive.
Name a song that you were obsessed with as a teenager.
"Losing My Religion" by R.E.M.
What is you favorite number?
259
News
Hits: 234

Three openly LGBTQ candidates for office received endorsements from the Philadelphia Democratic City Committee this week: Rue Landau for City Council at-large, and Wade Albert and Chesley Lightsey for judge. The endorsements, which are voted on by City Committee’s policy committee and ensure that...

Created: 16 May 2019